Big Data

Preparing Students for a Data-Rich World

This slide deck was presented at East Bay Educational Collaborative Professional Development Center in Warren, Rhode Island on April 12, 2016 where Ruth Krumhansl was a guest speaker. In addition to this presentation, Ruth also led several workshops on EDC Earth Science. The audience was about 45 teachers from all across New England.

Learn more about the workshop.

Building Global Interest in Data Literacy: A Dialogue-Workshop Report

What does it mean to be data literate in the world of “big data”? What should we be teaching students to better prepare them to participate in today’s workforce and society? What steps need to be taken to develop critical data literacy skills in schools? To seek answers to these questions, EDC’s Oceans of Data Institute (ODI) convened an expert panel of both data analysts and educators for a workshop on data literacy.

Visualizing Oceans of Data: Ocean Tracks – A Case Study

In 2013, the Oceans of Data Institute (ODI) released Visualizing Oceans of Data: Educational Interface Design report, which offers a set of guidelines for designing interactive tools to engage students with data. ODI applied these guidelines during the development of Ocean Tracks, an online interface that enables students to explor

Big Data, Big Promise

Ruth Krumhansl, Founder of the Oceans of Data Institute (ODI), describes all the ways big data is changing lives today, the challenges that big data brings, and why ODI is working to transform education to include more data-relevant instruction.

"Data will be part of [student's] future and it should be part of their instruction too".

 

Profile of a Big-Data-Enabled Specialist

ODI gathered a panel of experts from the scientific, education, business, and law enforcement fields to develop an occupational profile that describes the specific skills and knowledge needed to compete in a big-data-centered economy. This work is the first of its kind in the field. It is our hope that the results will help inform conversations about college and career readiness at the K–16 education level.

Differences in How Data is Approached Across Industry & Academia

Massive amounts of data are generated every day on Earth and beyond - upwards of 2.5 quintillion bytes a day, as estimated by CloudTweaks. This offers exciting opportunities to work with data, in both academia and industry. Which setting is a better fit for you? It depends on how you want to work with data. Although data propels work forward in both academic and non-academic settings, academic and industry folks have different needs of data, and therefore different relationships to data.

Data Investigations to Further Social Justice Inside and Outside of STEM

This article focuses on discussion and preliminary findings from classroom testing of the prototype learning module: Investigating Income Inequality in the U.S. In this module, students examine patterns of income inequality using person-level microdata from the American Community Survey (ACS) and the U.S. decennial census.

Profile of an Ideal Pathway Director

The colleges affiliated with the Coast Community College District (CCCD) in Southern California collaborate on delivering career pathways in several industry sectors. Their successful operation largely depends upon the individuals serving in the role of Pathway Director. Pathway Directors build partnerships with employers, provide outreach to schools and communities, and coordinate career related services to students. The profile of a Pathway Director describes these responsibilities in greater detail and identifies the skills, knowledge and behaviors needed to be effective in the job.

Perseverance

If the past month has done nothing else, it has shown us what a powerful force data can be in our daily lives. As the number of American lives lost from COVID passes half a million, state and county governments monitor the falling case rate data, which will determine when they can begin to re-open schools and businesses.

In Texas and across the Midwest, officials are having to come to terms with the fact that historical averages in weather patterns are not useful predictors of the conditions that occur during extreme weather events brought about by climate change.

Guide for Data Worker Internships

To speed and ease the transition from education to employment in data fields, many community colleges are establishing data internships. Internships provide students with immediate opportunities to apply their data skills and knowledge to the tasks and problems challenging data workers in today’s workplaces. Internships benefit both students and employers. They provide students with opportunities to work on data teams, to learn to solve real-world data problems found in local industries, and to develop new data skills working in industry sectors that interest them.

Pages

Back to Top